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Reblogged from rhamphotheca  173 notes
libutron:

Boat-billed Heron | ©Christian Goers
Cuero y Salado Wildlife Refuge, Honduras
The Boat-billed Heron or Boatbill, Cochlearius cochlearius, is a stocky nocturnal heron with very large beak. Bill is remarkably broad and heavy, with about 7, 5 cm long and 5 cm wide. It is blackish or grey on upper mandible, and yellow on lower mandible.
Boatbill can be found from Mexico to Bolivia and Northern Argentina. It lives in mangroves, freshwater marshes, wooded swamps, shores of lakes and rivers, ponds and streams in wet forest. 
The classification of this species has been the subject of some dispute, and it is sometimes placed in a family on its own.
Animalia - Chordata - Aves - Pelecaniformes - Ardeidae? - Cochlearius - C. cochlearius
More information.

libutron:

Boat-billed Heron | ©Christian Goers

Cuero y Salado Wildlife Refuge, Honduras

The Boat-billed Heron or Boatbill, Cochlearius cochlearius, is a stocky nocturnal heron with very large beak. Bill is remarkably broad and heavy, with about 7, 5 cm long and 5 cm wide. It is blackish or grey on upper mandible, and yellow on lower mandible.

Boatbill can be found from Mexico to Bolivia and Northern Argentina. It lives in mangroves, freshwater marshes, wooded swamps, shores of lakes and rivers, ponds and streams in wet forest. 

The classification of this species has been the subject of some dispute, and it is sometimes placed in a family on its own.

Animalia - Chordata - Aves - Pelecaniformes - Ardeidae? - CochleariusC. cochlearius

More information.

Reblogged from rhamphotheca  39,526 notes
wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS
Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.
Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.
They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.
Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."
Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."
Some videos: - Raven Dances with Wolf Pup - Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves- Crow teasing a wolf
(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)

wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS

Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.

Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.

They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.

Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."

Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."

Some videos: 
Raven Dances with Wolf Pup 
Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves
Crow teasing a wolf

(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)