Learn broadly, and with passion.

I run Biomedical Ephemera and Cabbaging Cove. See my "About Me" section in the Links to find them. Or do a Google. Whatever milks your Guernsey.
And will the room smell of formaldehyde from all the years you’ve been dead inside? And when the blood drops drip drip to the ground Will it make a sound, will it make sound? It’s safe to say there’s a history These are the last words that you’ll hear… What a price you paid for this victory, You won’t see my anger disappear.
And even a thousand miles away, I can feel you breathing down my neck And even a thousand miles away, I can feel you breathing…

And will the room smell of formaldehyde from all the years you’ve been dead inside?
And when the blood drops drip drip to the ground
Will it make a sound, will it make sound?

It’s safe to say there’s a history
These are the last words that you’ll hear…
What a price you paid for this victory,
You won’t see my anger disappear.

And even a thousand miles away, I can feel you breathing down my neck
And even a thousand miles away, I can feel you breathing…

Reblogged from libutron  1,535 notes

libutron:

Knitted fungus

These amazing knitted fungus, truly inspired by real mushrooms, are the result of extraordinary creative work of Leigh Martin, a fiber artist and nature enthusiast residing in Central Oklahoma (US).

Photos (top to bottom):

1. Parrot fungi

2. Clavaria zollingeri

3. Turkey tail

4. Anemone stinkhorn

5. Caesar’s mushroom

6. Jack-o’-lantern mushroom 

Reblogged from mycology  52 notes
olsonimagery:

"BOLETE"
EAGAN, MINNESOTA

While bushwhacking through Lebanon Hills Regional Park I came upon this Yellow-cracked Bolete (Boletus subtomentosus), an edible mushroom that I recognized from many years before. At first glance it appears to be bland in appearance, but once I picked the mushroom and turned it over I was pleasantly surprised. Rather than having gills on the underside of the cap like a lot of mushrooms, the bolete’s are known for having very small, dense pores. This section you see here is only about 1.5” long, and if you look closely you can see small grains of soil lodged in the pores near the bottom of the frame for scale. October, 2013.


Huh. I’ve been through that park. Never actually checked out the mushrooms in the area.

olsonimagery:

"BOLETE"

EAGAN, MINNESOTA

While bushwhacking through Lebanon Hills Regional Park I came upon this Yellow-cracked Bolete (Boletus subtomentosus), an edible mushroom that I recognized from many years before. At first glance it appears to be bland in appearance, but once I picked the mushroom and turned it over I was pleasantly surprised. Rather than having gills on the underside of the cap like a lot of mushrooms, the bolete’s are known for having very small, dense pores. This section you see here is only about 1.5” long, and if you look closely you can see small grains of soil lodged in the pores near the bottom of the frame for scale. October, 2013.

Huh. I’ve been through that park. Never actually checked out the mushrooms in the area.

Reblogged from mycology  50 notes

sercblogteen:

Did you know orchids, and lots of other plants, need fungi on their roots to germinate and grow?  Yep, without those gross, fuzzy blobs we wouldn’t have gorgeous orchids.  Now scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center are unraveling the role bacteria play in this relationship.  Bacteria live in and on the fungi, but how do they affect plant growth?  Click here to learn more.